How to Cool Down Your Dog This Summer 122256 - How to Cool Down Your Dog This Summer

How to Cool Down Your Dog This Summer

You might walk over and sit in the shade, sipping a cold glass of water, with your dog staring at you. Your dog is probably even hotter if you’re hot because he is covered in fur. There are plenty of different things that you can do to help cool down your dog and prevent him from getting a heat stroke.

 

If you have a dog, you need to be responsible and put in the effort required to ensure that your home environment is suitable for your dog. Count yourself lucky if you have a little dog with less body mass! It will generally be easier to cool small dogs than a large dog like a German Shepherd.

 

Find Some Shade

Shade isn’t always going to be wherever you are, but when you can get to shade, do it. Find a patio, big tree, a canopy, whatever you can to help cool down your dog during these hot summer days. The less sunlight there is, the cooler it will be because the sun hasn’t been shining enough to heat the ground directly.

 

Use a Wet Blanket or Ice Pack

Using a blanket or a beach towel that has been dampened and kept in the freezer is a great way to aid your dog in cooling. Place a bag of frozen vegetables or just a regular ice pack on the neck or groin where some of the most prominent blood vessels are to cool down your dog’s head or send cooled blood to the rest of the body. Ice packs may be more convenient for a small dog such as the Cockapoo when using a blanket could potentially drown him, and he might not be able to lift it off of himself, especially if it is wet or frozen! Be aware of the specific needs of the breed of dog you are interested in. If you are looking for Cockapoo puppies for sale you will need to be informed on the needs of smaller sized breeds.

 

Ice That Drink

On a hot summer day, you take a cold drink of water. Do you think that your dog would like one too? You need to keep their water fresh by replenishing it regularly. You can add ice to your water bottle or your dog’s bowl to help lower the temperature of the water you’re serving your dog.

 

Always Carry Water

Make sure you bring a water bottle whenever you leave your house to run or walk with your dog. A quart of bottled water can easily be frozen, allowing it to stay cool even on a hot day. If your dog goes too long without water, he can get heatstroke and die. So be careful even if you’re not planning on going out for long; you never know where you might find yourself!

 

Take a Dip

If you are blessed enough to have a pool or be near a lake or pond, you’ll probably be tempted to go and jump in it with your dog. That may not seem like a bad idea, but be cautious. If your dog is too hot or bordering on heat stroke, it might worsen things. If you’re not careful, you could lower your dog’s skin and surface temperature too abruptly. This may further heat the internal organs, which worsens the overheating of the body’s core. Instead, just have your dog slowly get into the water, allowing him the proper time to adjust to the temperature. You can also get a small child’s wading pool and set it on the patio for quick access to shallow water because they generally aren’t very deep.

 

If it is too hot for yourself, it is definitely too hot for your dog. Summers get really hot, so take care of your dog! Somedays, you might just be better off staying inside the house, sitting by an air conditioning unit. Ensure that you are familiar with and know when your dog might be overheating and impending a heat stroke. If your dog ever gets a heatstroke, cool him down and take him to the veterinarian.